More Lighthouses: Maine Style

Maine wasn’t on our radar when we set visiting fifteen lighthouses as one of our goals for 2015; but when we decided to take a September New England trip, Maine lighthouses were a natural part of our time along the coast.

Our first night in Maine, we stopped in York, the site of Cape Neddick Light. From Sohier Park we viewed the lighthouse located atop a rock island a short distance off shore,

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and as I turned around, the view of a white rowboat beached on the rock below with an inn in the background brought together everything New England.

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Later that afternoon, we burned off our seafood lunch by walking eight-tenths of a mile out to Rockland Breakwater Lighthouse along the granite breakwater.

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Couldn’t have asked for a more beautiful day surrounded by the blue sky and waters.

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Egg Rock, the small island with a lighthouse, was barely visible from the mainland; but that couldn’t keep us from counting this as lighthouse number twenty-one. Located in Bar Harbor, we were able to photograph the lighthouse from Acadia National Park.

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From Acadia’s Schoodic Point, the Winter Harbor Lighthouse is clearly visible, but again its location on an island in Frenchman Bay prevents an up-close visit.

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Our final Maine lighthouse visit…the Prospect Harbor Light. Located behind a fence and a Coast Guard manned security booth, makes access by the public impossible. However, by climbing down on the rocky beach along the road leading to the light, it is possible to get a good, unobstructed view.

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Twenty-three lighthouses. Looks like we underestimated our abilities. And with a camping trip in the Panhandle yet to come, I don’t think we’re finished.

Maine Eats

It’s strange that John never eats lobster EXCEPT when in Maine, and as soon as he hits the state line, he starts looking for a place to eat the state’s best known crustacean. Since we crossed the state line well after dark and past the closing time of most restaurants in York, his lobster obsession had to wait another day, but that turned out to be a good thing because we just so happened to be at one of Maine’s most famous lobster shacks at lunchtime. We got in line in Wiscasset at Red’s Eats around 11:30 and waited for about 45 minutes for a lobster roll and the first taste of Maine.

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A lobster roll, fries, onion rings, slaw and fried haddock (I don’t eat lobster) and we were officially welcomed to the state of Maine.

Once in Acadia National Park, a meal at the Jordan Pond House was required to make the visit complete. The traditional food at Jordan Pond House: popovers. Maine Seafood Chowder served with popovers and strawberry jam…yum.

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And we had to indulge in Maine’s most famous dessert. How could we pass on blueberry crisp topped with ice cream?

There was only one more meal needed to make the trip complete. Lobster at a traditional lobster pound. A place to sit on the dock, overlooking the lobster boats and a tank of the live creatures waiting to be served to diners. After a day at Schoodic Peninsula, what we found was not quite a lobster pound, no whole lobsters plucked from the tank and dropped into boiling water, (although there was a tank). No whole lobster, but a lobster roll (and a grilled cheese sandwich) eaten on a dock…the perfect setting.

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Lobster obsession satisfied until the next time we cross the state line.